Tag Archives: school integrated pest management

SPN: Educational Materials for Your School IPM Program

Three new infographics and two detailed publications from the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service help demystify the best practices for controlling pests in schools, universities and other areas where humans occupy close quarters. “The average person, while not a pest control expert, is definitely affected when an infestation occurs,” said Janet Hurley, AgriLife Extension specialist in school integrated pest management, Dallas. “That means the average person is integral to controlling pests, especially where large groups of people converge.” Hurley, co-author of the new educational materials, called the infographics… Read More →

SPN: IPM Training Materials, Hurricane Harvey Storm Information

It’s late August and this this is the newsletter that we (AgriLife Extension School IPM Team) welcomes everyone back to school.  As I write this newsletter the weather advisory for Texas isn’t just hot, but hurricane preparedness.  When I look at the map of Texas being covered I realized almost half of the schools in the state could be impacted by Hurricane Harvey.  So, for this newsletter I will share some educational materials you can use with staff not just for IPM, but also for storm safety. As… Read More →

SPN: Fleas and Ticks

By: Dr. Mike Merchant, Professor and Urban Entomologist Fleas and ticks are not the kind of pests one normally expects to find in schools, but then what’s normal about school IPM?  Several recent calls to our office have concerned flea and tick problems, some of which are apparently being brought from home, and some which may be originating on school grounds.  So let’s learn some basics about these two pest types. Fleas are insect pests of warm blooded animals.  About 95% of flea species specialize in feeding on… Read More →

School Pest News, Volume 15, Issue 11, November 2015

Kissing bugs and Chagas disease. By Wizzie Brown, Extension Program Specialist III Triatomine bugs, also known as kissing bugs, reduviid bugs and cone-nose bugs, are almost an inch long with elongated cone-shaped heads. The body is grayish-brown with a wide abdomen that has flattened sides. The flattened sides of the abdomen stick out beyond the wing margins and are marked with red, orange or yellow stripes. Nymphs (immatures) look similar to adults, but lack fully developed wings. There are other insects in Texas that look similar and can… Read More →